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Aarhus University

Aarhus University

Team Leader

Prof. Søren Dalsgaard

Professor
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Dr. Ditte Demontis (PhD)

Associate Professor
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Team Staff

Prof. Anders Børglum (MD, PhD)

Professor
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Dr. Thomas D. Als (PhD)

Associate Professor
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Dr. Isabell Brikell

Postdoc
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Dr. Theresa Wimberley

Postdoc
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Aske Astrup

Statistician
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Institute Presentation

Aarhus University (AU) is the second oldest university in Denmark, founded in 1928, and today includes 38,000 students and 8,000 employees. The National Center for Register-based Research (NCRR) was established in year 2000 at Aarhus University under the leadership of Professor Preben Bo Mortensen. Today, NCRR consists of approximately 50 staff members who cover a broad area of research expertise, ranging from medicine and statistics to pharmacology, sociology, psychology, and genetics.

In TIMESPAN we will link large, Danish population-based registers, including health, prescription and socioeconomic data, to study prognosis in patients with cardiometabolic disease and ADHD. Prognostic outcomes will include psychosocial outcomes, morbidity, mortality, and ADHD treatment discontinuity.

The Department of Biomedicine is part of the Faculty of Health, and employs some 450 people and covers a range of research areas in e.g. human biology, genetics and molecular and cellular disease mechanisms.

In TIMESPAN we will elucidate the role of genetics in discontinuation of ADHD medication treatment. We will identify specific genetic variants involved in ADHD medication discontinuation by combining genetic and prescription data from Denmark, Sweden and the Netherlands. Additionally, we will characterize the polygenic architecture of ADHD medication discontinuation in order to evaluate if persons with ADHD that discontinue medication treatment has increased genetic load of genetic variants associated with e.g. other psychiatric disorders compared to individuals that continue treatment.